Curiosity Corner

 
Item is out of stock.
Model #: CPT-Bundle
Manufacturer: Alexander Publishing
 

Fux Meets Goetschius Counterpoint Study Bundle

List Price $149.50
Your Price $89.95
You Save $59.55
 
Share

Order Info Banner


Bundle Content


In ONE SPECIAL BUNDLE you'll get a ton of training in the art of Counterpoint by two master teachers.
This bundle gives you The Instant Composer: Counterpoint by Fux Home Study Course (containing a revised and updated PDF edition of Fux's classic book (561 pps) and also 14 video lectures and bonus PDFs), PLUS the revised and simplified PDF editions of Percy Goetschius' Elementary 18th-19th Century Counterpoint (212 pps) PLUS Counterpoint Applied (498 pps).

That's a total of 1,271 pages of counterpoint instruction plus videos!

Counterpoint by Fux is the book that trained Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven, and a host of other wildly successful composers. While film composer John Williams stated during a class at the UCLA Film School that he learned counterpoint by going through Percy Goetschius' books.

Click on the tabs for more info on each title included in this Special Bundle.

About The Instant Composer: Counterpoint by Fux Home Study Course


For the first time, we're releasing in a single package the PDF book The Instant Composer: Counterpoint by Fux, PLUS Peter L. Alexander's 14 video lectures and Bonus PDFs so you can have this advanced study option to do at your own pace. These fourteen video lessons and material in the book are roughly the equivalent of a semester's worth of work in college, again, that you do at your own pace.

Please note: this is NOT an academic theoretical approach. Initially, you'll do all your work with just the Dorian mode. From there, all the remaining modes are open to you.

Please note: the course does NOT teach RULES! It teaches PRINCIPLES that you can apply to ANY style of music. Once you've learned to apply these principles, you then have the skill to write music on demand - in as many different music styles you know: classical, jazz, Rap, you name it!

That's why this is a practical course for songwriters, arrangers, and composers who want to:

  • improve their melodic skills
  • expand their melodic language by learning to write modally
  • learn how to harmonize their song
  • learn how to create a starting bass line
  • learn how to create a counterline above and below the melody
  • learn how to create interesting harmonizations
  • learn how to improvise
  • (for jazz players) learn how to apply chord scales in jazz and other styles


  • Course Content


    You will:
  • write and record all your work
  • apply concepts with exercises
  • apply concepts to a maximum of five different songs, preferably from different styles

  • You'll need: # to budget 2-4 hours per week # preferably have vocal samples to record your work so that all examples with a vocal/choral sound

    The Required Text for this course is Alexander Publishing's Edition of Counterpoint by Fux. A PDF eBook edition of this title is provided for you FREE with this course.

    100% Downloadable Content:
    You get almost 500MB of download PDFs and QuickTime Video Files. Download links will be available for 7 days in your Order History by clicking on the 'Product Info' button next to your order in your "Order History" and scrolling down the page for the links.

    Week 1
    Lesson 1 - melodic movement and song analysis
    Lesson 2 -Two-voice motion

    Week 2
    Lesson 3 - Implied harmony
    Lesson 4 - Four modes

    Week 3
    Lessons 5-6 - One against one

    Week 4
    Lessons 7-8 - Two against one

    Week 5
    Lessons 9-10 - Four against one

    Week 6
    Lessons 11-12 - Syncopation

    Week 7
    Lessons 13-14 - The whole pie

    About Elementary 18th-19th Century Counterpoint (PDF E-Book)


    Counterpoint is one of the technical processes of music writing. The object of contrapuntal practice is to empower you to add melody to melody - or to obtain a blend of two, three, or more tone-lines that agree with each other harmonically and yet are sufficiently independent of each other to present really different melodic lines.

    Briefly Defined:
  • Melody is a succession, or continuous line, of single tones.
  • Harmony is a succession of chords or vertical columns of tones that harmonize in their simultaneous presentation.
  • Counterpoint is the agreeable combination of individually perfect, but independent, melodies.

  • What You'll Learn:
    Chapter 1 - The Single Melodic Line
    Chapter 2 - Wider Leaps
    Chapter 3 - Exceptional Progressions - Minor Mode
    Chapter 4 - The Combination of Two Melodic Lines
    Chapter 5 - The Minor Mode
    Chapter 6 - Exceptional Intervals: Major & Minor
    Chapter 7 - Rhythmic Diversity - Two Notes to a Given Beat
    Chapter 8 - Modulations
    Chapter 9 - Three Notes To A Beat
    Chapter 10 - Syncopation, Or Shifted Rhythm
    Chapter 11 - The Tie, Continued, Rests
    Chapter 12 - Four Notes To A Beat
    Chapter 13 - Four Notes To A Beat, As Amplified Forms
    Chapter 14 – Rhythmic Movement in Different Parts
    Chapter 15 - Motive Development Imitation
    Chapter 16 - Three-Part Harmony & As Melodic Harmonization
    Chapter 17 - Secondary Chords & Sequences
    Chapter 18 - With Modulations & Altered Steps
    Chapter 19 - Contrapuntal Harmony
    Chapter 20 - Three-Part Counterpoint
    Chapter 21 - Motive Development With Three Contrapuntal Parts
    Chapter 22 - Four-Part Harmony
    Chapter 23 - Modulations
    Chapter 24 - Contrapuntal Four-Part Harmony
    Chapter 25 - Four-Part Counterpoint
    Chapter 26 - Motive Development

    212 pps.

    About Percy Goetshcius

    Richard Rodgers (of Rodgers & Hammerstein) said that Percy Goetschius was to harmony what Gray was to anatomy. Rodgers should know as Dr. Goetschius was Richard Rodgers' teacher at the school that later became Juilliard.

    Dr. Goetschius' list of students was a true Who's Who of composers and composers whose lives spanned into the early 21st Century. Outside of Nadia Boulanger, it's doubtful that any other single music teacher has had such a profound impact on his students as Percy Goetschius did.

    What we know of Dr. Goetschius we found on line through the Passaic County Historical Society, Lambert Castle, in Paterson, NJ.

    Percy Goetschius is a native Patersonian who has won international fame in the teaching of the theory of composition. Born in this city in 1853, he was piano pupil of Robert E. H. Gehring, a prominent teacher of that era. Mr. Goetschius was the organist of the Second Presbyterian Church 1868-1870 and of the First Presbyterian 1870-73, and pianist of Mr. Benson’s Paterson Choral Society. He went to Stuttgart, Wurtenberg, in 1873 to study in the conservatory, and soon advanced to the teaching ranks. The King conferred upon him the title of royal professor. He composed much, and reviewed performances for the press. In 1892 he took a like position in the New England Conservatory, Boston, and four years later opened a studio in that city. In 1905 he went to the staff of the New York Institute of Music and Art, headed by Dr. Frank Damrosch. Prof. Goetschius has published nine textbooks on theory, which are accepted as standards in the musical world.

    About Counterpoint Applied (PDF E-Book)


    This book is a sequel to The Homophonic Forms of Musical Composition and compares in every detail to the system used in the Homophonic Forms.

    The first section of the book deals with specific details of contrapuntal discipline - partly because of their inseparable bearing on polyphonic form, and partly as an overview for students not familiar with contrapuntal writing. The remainder of the book gives an exhaustive look at the practical application of polyphonic forms to composition using examples from the classical repertoire.

    A good working knowledge of beginning harmony and counterpoint as covered in Applied Professional Harmony 101 and 102 is recommended to get the most out of this volume.

    What You'll Learn:
    Section One - The Fundamental Principles of the Simple (Two-Voice) Polyphonic Style
    Chapter 1 - Condition 1
    Chapter 2 - Condition 2
    Chapter 3 - Condition 3
    Chapter 4 - Development of Thematic Resources and Various Modes of Imitation
    Division Two - The Invention-Forms
    Chapter 5 - The Two Voice Invention
    Chapter 6 - The Contrapuntal Association of Three
    Chapter 7 - The Three-Voice Invention
    Chapter 8 - The Invention for More Than Three Voices
    Chapter 9 - Free Polyphonic Forms; the Invention as Prelude; the Fantasia, Toccata, Etc.
    Division Three - Chorale-Figuration
    Chapter 10 - The Small Species of Chorale-Figuration
    Chapter 11 - The Large Species of Chorale-Figuration
    Division Four - The Fugue
    Chapter 12 - The Four-Voice Fugue; the Exposition
    Chapter 13 - The Fugue With Less or More Than Four
    Chapter 14 - Miscellaneous Varieties of the Fugue-Form
    Chapter 15 - The Double Fugue
    Chapter 16 - The Triple-Fugue
    Chapter 17 - The Round, or Round-Canon
    Chapter 18 - The Progressive Canon
    Chapter 19 - The Two-Voice Canon, Accompanied; Instrumental
    Chapter 20 - The Canon for More Than Two Parts
    Chapter 21 - The Double-Canon, Etc.
    Chapter 22 - Canon as Chorale-Elaboration
    Appendix - Klengel: 20 Canons and Fugues

    498 pps.

    About Percy Goetshcius

    Richard Rodgers (of Rodgers & Hammerstein) said that Percy Goetschius was to harmony what Gray was to anatomy. Rodgers should know as Dr. Goetschius was Richard Rodgers' teacher at the school that later became Juilliard.

    Dr. Goetschius' list of students was a true Who's Who of composers and composers whose lives spanned into the early 21st Century. Outside of Nadia Boulanger, it's doubtful that any other single music teacher has had such a profound impact on his students as Percy Goetschius did.

    What we know of Dr. Goetschius we found on line through the Passaic County Historical Society, Lambert Castle, in Paterson, NJ.

    Percy Goetschius is a native Patersonian who has won international fame in the teaching of the theory of composition. Born in this city in 1853, he was piano pupil of Robert E. H. Gehring, a prominent teacher of that era. Mr. Goetschius was the organist of the Second Presbyterian Church 1868-1870 and of the First Presbyterian 1870-73, and pianist of Mr. Benson’s Paterson Choral Society. He went to Stuttgart, Wurtenberg, in 1873 to study in the conservatory, and soon advanced to the teaching ranks. The King conferred upon him the title of royal professor. He composed much, and reviewed performances for the press. In 1892 he took a like position in the New England Conservatory, Boston, and four years later opened a studio in that city. In 1905 he went to the staff of the New York Institute of Music and Art, headed by Dr. Frank Damrosch. Prof. Goetschius has published nine textbooks on theory, which are accepted as standards in the musical world.