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The Next MIDI Book: Starting With The Numbers - Downloadable PDF

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Overview


Dusted off from the Alexander Publishing vaults, we bring you a Katamar favorite title from the 1990s: The Next MIDI Book: Starting With The Numbers - by Lorenz Rychner with Dan Walker.

147 pages.

Covers: The language of MIDI, the binary and hexadecimal numbering system, converting numbers across numbering systems, overview of system exclusive messages, and much more!

From the Foreword:
This book covers the numbers of MIDI. What they are, and what they mean. No more mysteries. No glossy vagueness, just plain language explaining what's what. And before i get into the numbers, I deal with the various ways of Hooking up MIDI Equipment.

This book covers the numbers of MIDI. What they are, and what they mean. No more mysteries. No glossy vagueness, just plain language explaining what's what. And before I get into the numbers, I deal with the various ways of hooking up MIDI equipment. If your system is in place and working, skip the first section. MIDI stands for Musical Instrument Digital Interface. An interface is a device that allows for communication and data exchange. Like music paper that communicates the musical data to whoever reads it. Or a message pad on the fridge door, or a telephone, fax machine, cable tv hookup, etc. Digital means that we're dealing with digits, which means numbers. MIDI data is exchanged between the computer brains of MIDI instruments, and "real" computers like Macintosh, Atari, IBM etc. Computers can only deal with numbers, so we have to learn the MIDI numbers to understand what's going on.

Many of us musicians don't feel comfortable when lots of numbers come our way. And yet, we count numbers all the time: Chord intervals, notes on staffs, scale steps, rhythmic beats, note durations, etc. Music is almost entirely expressed in numbers, openly or disguised: Thirds, sevenths, quarter notes, II-V-I chords relationships, snare on two and four, and so on. We just don't think of these as numbers, let alone as mathematics. Because we know their meaning, that's why.

MIDI numbers mean similarly musical things: Play a note (Note On message), with a certain expression (Velocity), on such and such an instrument (MIDI channel), using such and such a sound/patch/preset (Program change number), in sync with a given tempo (MIDI Clock), and more. So there is really no reason to hesitate before learning MIDI as a well organized bunch of meaningful numbers. And when things go wrong (remember Murphy and his law?), a solid knowledge of MIDI lets you troubleshoot and return to productivity before the creative juices have dried out.

While dealing with the MIDI numbers and their meaning, you'll get to know two new ways of counting. Different from the decimal system (ten cents to a dime, 100 cents to a dollar, etc.) that we use day in and day out. They are the binary and hexidecimal numbering systems. Both are much easier to deal with in the context of MIDI than decimal. But first things first: setting up a MIDI network.

Click here to Download a Detailed Table of Contents PDF for The Next MIDI Book.

Summary Table of Contents
Chapter 1: From Transmitter To Receiver
Chapter 2: Distributing The MIDI Data
Chapter 3: The Topics - What MIDI Is Talking About
Chapter 4: The Binary Numbering System
Chapter 5: The Hexadecimal Numbering System
Chapter 6: Converting Numbers Across Numbering Systems
Chapter 7: Status Bytes And Data Bytes
Chapter 8: Overview Of Message Types
Chapter 9: Note On: $9x/144-159
Chapter 10: Note Off: $8x/128-143 And Running Status
Chapter 11: Two Kinds Of Aftertouch: $Ax and $Dx
Chapter 12: Pitch Bend: $Ex/224-239
Chapter 13: Program Changes: $Cx/192-207
Chapter 14: Overview of Control Change And Mode Messages: $Bx/176-191
Chapter 15: Continuous Controllers $Bx $00 thru $Bx $3F/00-63
Chapter 16: Switch Controllers $Bx $40 thru $Bx $61/64-97
Chapter 17: Registered And Non-Registered Parameters $Bx $62 through $Bx $65/98-101
Chapter 18: Channel Mode Messages $Bx $7A thru $Bx $7C/121-123
Chapter 19: The MIDI Receive Modes Bx $7C thru $7F/124-127
Chapter 20: Overview Of System Messages
Chapter 21: System Common Messages
Chapter 22: System Real Time
Chapter 23: Overview Of System Exclusive Messages
Chapter 24: Manufacturer System Exclusive Messages
Chapter 25: Non-Real Time Sysex: Sample Dump Standard
Chapter 26: Universal Real Time Sysex: MIDI Time Code
Epilog